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English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions 


DESCRIPTIONS OF PEOPLE, page 3

Idioms
from:   'leave no stone unturned'   to:  'work like a charm'


  • leave no stone unturned
    • If you try everything possible in order to achieve or to find something, you leave no stone unturned.
      "The management left no stone unturned in their efforts to find a solution to the crisis."

  • make light work of (something)
    • If a person makes light work of something, they do it very easily or with little effort.
      "The boys made light work of the cleaning up. The house was spotless in no time."

  • mean business
    • If someone means business, they are serious about what they announce.
      "The boss says that in future any missing material will be reported to the police, and he looks as though he means business."

  • ahead of the pack
    • If a person or organisation is ahead of the pack, they are better or more successful than their rivals.
      "Our products will have to be more innovative if we want to stay ahead of the pack."

  • run a taut ship
    (also: 'run a tight ship')
    • When a group or organisation is run in a well-ordered and disciplined manner, the person in charge runs a taut (or tight) ship.
      "The director of the scout camp runs a taut ship."

  • sail through something
    • If you sail through something, for example a test or presentation, you succeed in doing it without difficulty.
      "Demonstrating the new product was no problem for Pedro. He sailed through it."

  • sell ice to Eskimos
    • This expression is used to describe a person who has the ability
      to persuade someone to accept something totally unnecessary or useless.
      "It's not surprising Mark was named 'salesman of the year'. He could sell ice to Eskimos!"

  • take matters into your own hands
    • If you take matters into your hands, you take action yourself rather than waiting for others to intervene.
      "When Susan saw the lack of progress, she decided to take matters into her own hands."

  • tricks of the trade
    • This term refers to a clever or expert way of doing things, especially in a job.
      "He's a tough negotiator; he knows all the tricks of the trade."

  • tried and tested
    • If a method has been tried and tested, it can be trusted because it has been used successfully in the past and is known to work.
      "There's no risk involved. The method has been tried and tested."

  • walk and chew gum
    • If you can walk and chew gum (at the same time), you are able to do more than one thing at a time.
      "Why did you hire that guy? He can't walk and chew gum at the same time!"

  • ways and means
    • To say that there are ways and means of achieving something means that there are several methods which will produce the desired result.
      "All ways and means wil be used to provide assistance to the survivors."

  • work like a charm
    • If something such as a product or method works like a charm, it functions very well or has the desired effect.
      "I tried cleaning it with vinegar and it worked like a charm!"

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More Idioms: 

 Efficiency - Competence

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