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English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions 


ACTIONS - BEHAVIOUR, page 8

(Idioms:  help a lame dog  →  keep your nose to the grindstone)


  • help a lame dog over a stile
    • If you help a lame dog over a stile, you help someone who is in difficulty or trouble, or come to the aid of a person in need.
      "You can trust him - he's always ready to help a lame dog over a stile."

  • herd mentality
    • People with the herd mentality tend to do what everyone else does, no matter how ridiculous or stupid.
      "One example of herd mentality is when people rush to get on the first bus when there are several empty ones waiting."

  • hit below the belt
    • If you do something considered to be unfair, or make a cruel remark, you hit below the belt.
      "Politicians sometimes use personal information to hit their rivals below the belt."

  • hit the panic button
    • When you hit or press the panic button, you raise the alarm too quickly or react too hastily in a difficult or stressful situation.
      "Calm down! There's no need to hit the panic button yet!"

  • hold the fort
    • When you hold the fort, you look after a place or a business in the absence of the person who is normally in charge.
      "Rosie, could you hold the fort please while I go to the post office?"

  • hold your own
    • If you can hold your own, you are well able to defend yourself when under attack.
      "We should ask Jane to represent us; she can hold her own in any argument."

  • (a) hue and cry
    • If there is a hue and cry about something, there is loud opposition to it.
      "There will no doubt be a great hue and cry when the reorganisation is announced."

  • jump in (at) the deep end
    • When you jump in (or are thrown in) at the deep end, you do something without any help or preparation, in an area where you have little or no experience.
      "He got a job as a salesman, for which he had no training, so he just had to jump in at the deep end."

  • keep your feet on the ground
    • A person who keeps their feet on the ground continues to act in a sensible and practical way, even if they become successful.
      "His invention was an instant success but he kept his feet on the ground and invested his money very wisely."

  • keep your fingers crossed
    • If you keep your fingers crossed, you hope that something will be successful.
      "I'm doing my driving test tomorrow. Keep your fingers crossed for me!"

  • keep a level head
    • If you keep a level head,  you remain calm and sensible no matter how difficult or distressful the situation may be.
      "All through the hijacking the pilot kept a level head."

  • keep your nose clean
    • A person who keeps their nose clean behaves well and avoids trouble.
      "He spent a term in prison a few years ago but he's kept his nose clean ever since."

  • keep your nose to the grindstone
    • A person who keeps their nose to the grindstone is someone who concentrates on working or studying hard. me
      "She was so determined to get into the college of her choice that she kept her nose to the grindstone all year."

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