Follow us on Facebook
Facebook icon

Welcome to my guestmap
Please place a pin on the guestmap to show where you come from.

Free Guestmap from Bravenet.com
Many thanks for all your encouraging messages.

Guestmap information

Visitors:
 


English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions 


Alphabetical List of Idioms T, page 7

Idioms T, page 7:  from:   'through thick and thin'   to:   'thrilled to bits'


  • through thick and thin
    • If someone does something through thick and thin, they do it in spite of all the difficulties and problems.
      "Bob is famous today, but Tom is still his best friend, the one who supported him through thick and thin."

  • thin end of the wedge
    • To refer to an event or action as the thin end of the wedge means that it is thought to be the beginning of something that will become more serious.
      "According to the media, today's outsourcing is just the thin end of the wedge."

  • a thin line
    • When there is a thin (or fine) line between feeling or situations, there is a point where it is difficult to distinguish between them.
      "There's a thin line between showing concern and being indiscreet - so don't overdo it! "

  • thin on the top
    • If someone, usually a man, is thin on the top, they are losing their hair or going bald.
      "Dad's gone a bit thin on the top in the last few years."

  • thing of the past
    • Something which no longer exists or is rarely used today is a thing of the past.
      "Few people use video cassettes today - they've become a thing of the past."

  • things are looking up
    • To say that things are looking up means that the situation is improving and you feel more positive about the future.
      "Andy has got two job interviews next week so things are looking up."

  • think again
    • If you tell someone to think again, you advise them to reconsider the situation and perhaps change their decision.
      "Your apartment is well located; you should think again before selling it."

  • think better of it
    • If you think better of something, you decide not to do something that you intended to do.
      "I wanted to go shopping, but when I saw the crowded car park I thought better of it."

  • think on your feet
    • A person who thinks on their feet is capable of adjusting rapidly to new developments and making quick decisions.
      "Good lawyers need to be able to think on their feet when pleading a case."

  • think outside the box
    • People who think outside the box try to find innovative ideas or solutions.
      "Our competitors are more creative than us - they really think outside the box!"

  • think the sun rises and sets on someone
    • If you consider someone to be the most wonderful person in the world, you think the sun rises and sets on them.
      "She adores her husband - she thinks the sun rises and sets on him!"

  • think the world of
    • If you think the world of someone, you like or admire them very much.
      "She's a wonderful grandmother - the children think the world of her."

  • thinly veiled
    • If something such as a feeling or reaction is thinly veiled, it is barely hidden.
      "His disappointment was thinly veiled when he saw what he had won."

  • thorn in your side
    • If you say that someone is a thorn in your side, you mean that they continually irritate or annoy you.
      "Jane finds her mother-in-law very irritating, a real thorn in her side!"

  • thorny issue
    • If you are faced with a thorny issue, you have to deal with a difficult or unpleasant problem.
      "Copyright and content duplication are thorny issues these days."

  • thrilled to bits
    • Someone who is thrilled to bits is extremely pleased about something.
      "Sophie was thrilled to bits when her project was selected."

previous page... next page ...

More Idioms: 

 alphabetical lists T ... 



 more alphabetical lists... 
« A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ »



Please note that British English spelling is used on this website.

 cookie policy