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English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions 


Alphabetical List of Idioms K, page 2

Idioms K, page 2:  from:   'keep your options open'   to:   'kick yourself'


  • keep your options open
    • When you keep your options open, you postpone making a decision so that you can choose among several possible courses of action.
      "The offer sounds good, but keep your options open until you're sure it's the best choice."

  • keep someone posted
    • If someone asks you to keep them posted, they want you to keep them informed about a situation.
      "Our agent promised to keep us posted on developments in the negotiations."

  • keep things in proportion
    • If you react to a situation in a sensible way, without exaggerating the importance or seriousness of the facts, you keep things in proportion.
      "Yes, we've got a problem, but let's try to keep things in proportion."

  • keep your shirt on!
    • If you tell somebody to keep their shirt on, you are asking them to calm down.
      "Keep your shirt on Bob. Just give your version of what happened!"

  • keep a stiff upper lip
    • If a person keeps a stiff upper lip, they contain their emotion and do not let other people see their feelings.
      "When she heard the bad news, she kept a stiff upper lip."

  • keep something under your hat
    • To keep something under one's hat  means to keep a secret.
      "My boss has promised me a promotion, but it's not official yet, so keep it under your hat."

  • keep something under wraps
    • If something is kept under wraps, it is held secret and not revealed to anyone.
      "The plan was kept under wraps until the contract was officially signed."

  • keep up appearances
    • A person who keeps up appearances  maintains an outward show of prosperity or well-being in order to hide their difficulties from others.
      "Leo continued to keep up appearances even when business was bad."

  • keep up with Joneses
    • Someone who tries to keep up with the Joneses  tries to have the same possessions or social achievements as someone else in order to appear equally important.
      "First the Browns moved their children to an expensive school. Now the Smiths have done the same. It's silly how some people feel they have to keep up with the Joneses!"

  • keep the wolf from door
    • To keep the wolf from the door  you need to have enough money to buy food and other basic essentials in order to survive.
      "My grandparents earned barely enough money to keep the wolf from the door."

  • put the kibosh on
    • If you do something to prevent a plan or activity from happening or developing, you put the kibosh on it.
      "The bank's refusal to grant him a loan put the kibosh on Jack's project."

  • kick the bucket
    • The expression kick the bucket  is a lighthearted way of talking about death.
      "Hugo will inherit when his grandfather kicks the bucket."

  • kick up a fuss
    • A person who kicks up a fuss  creates a disturbance, especially by complaining or protesting about something.
      "The service was so slow in the restaurant that several customers began to kick up a fuss."

  • get a kick out of something
    • If you get a kick out of something, you feel enjoyment or excitement from something.
      "Tania is a bit strange - she gets a kick out of listening to other people's phone messages."

  • kick yourself
    • If you feel like kicking yourself, you are angry with yourself for something you have or have not done.
      "I could have kicked myself for forgetting Emily's birthday."

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More Idioms: 

 alphabetical lists K:  K1    K2    K3

 more alphabetical lists... 
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