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English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions 


Alphabetical List of Idioms H, page 12

Idioms H, page 12:  from:   'straight from horse's mouth'   to:   'hustle and bustle'


  • straight from horse's mouth
    • If you learn something straight from the horse's mouth, the information is given to you by someone who is directly involved.
      "How do you know Sam has resigned?"
      "I got it straight from the horse's mouth - Sam told me himself!"


  • hot off the press
    • If a news article, for example, is hot off the press, it has just been published and contains the most recent information on the subject.
      "I just got it hot off the press; another bank has gone bankrupt."

  • hot on the trail
    • If you are hot on the trail of someone or something, you are very close to finding them.
      "The police are hot on the trail of the bank robber."

  • hot under the collar
    • If you get hot under the collar, you feel annoyed, indignant or embarrassed.
      "If anyone questions his proposals, Joe immediately gets hot under the collar."

  • hot potato
    • A hot potato is a very sensitive and controversial matter which is difficult to deal with.
      "The new Prime Minister hasn't been confronted with any hot potatoes yet."

  • like a house on fire
    • Two people who get on like a house on fire have similar interests and quickly become good friends.
      "As soon as Sarah met her brother's girlfriend, they got on like a house on fire."

  • (not) give house room
    • If you refuse togive house room to someone or something, you do not accept them into your home because you dislike or disapprove of them.
      "I wouldn't give house room to that painting - it's grotesque!"

  • on the house
    • Something which is on the house is offered free of charge, usually in a bar or restaurant.
      "The new owner of the bar offered us a drink on the house."

  • put (your) house in order
    • If you tell someone to put their house in order, you are saying that they should organise their own affairs or take care of their own problems before giving advice to other people.
      "You should put your house in order before telling me what to do!"

  • household name
    • When the name of something becomes very familiar because it is so often used, it is called a household name or word.
      "The product was so successful that its name became a household name in no time."

  • how the other half lives
    • This expression refers to the way of life of another social group.
      "He prefers not to know how the other half lives."

  • hue and cry
    • If there is a hue and cry about something, there is loud opposition to it.
      "There will no doubt be a great hue and cry when the reorganisation is announced."

  • hunky-dory
    • Using the expression 'hunky dory' is an informal way of saying that everything is satisfactory and there are no problems.
      "Need any help?"  Everything's hunky dory, thanks."

  • hustle and bustle
    • This term refers to busy energetic activity in an atmosphere of general excitement.
      "I prefer to live in the country. I hate the hustle and bustle of city life."

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