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English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions 


Alphabetical List of Idioms C, page 11

Idioms C, page 11:  from:   'come to a head'   to:   'common knowledge'


  • come to a head
    • If a problem or difficult situation comes to a head, it reaches a point where action has to be taken.
      "The conflict came to a head yesterday when rioting broke out in the streets."

  • come to your senses
    • If you come to your senses you start to think clearly and behave sensibly.
      "She finally came to her senses when she saw that public transport was faster than driving in the city."

  • come rain or shine
    • If a person does something come rain or shine, they do it regularly, whatever the circumstances.
      "He goes to the gym club every day, come rain or shine."

  • come out of the woodwork
    • When things, or people, come out of the woodwork, they appear or emerge unexpectedly, as if from nowhere, and usually in large numbers.
      "As soon as we added the swimming pool, our children had 'friends' coming out of the woodwork!"

  • come out in the wash
    • This expression is used to tell someone not to worry about a mistake or problem because it won't have any serious effect and everything will work out all right.
      "Yes, he was furious when it happened, but don't worry - it'll all come out in the wash"

  • come up in the world
    • A person who hascome up in the world is richer than before and has a higher social status.
      "My old school friend has bought an apartment overlooking Central Park. She has certainly come up in the world."

  • come up roses
    • f things come up roses, the end result is successful or positive, even if there were difficult times.
      "After several disappointments, everything seems to be coming up roses for the tennis player this year."

  • come/turn up trumps
    • To say that someone has come up trumps means that they achieved unexpectedly good results.
      "Against all expectations, our team came up trumps in the cup final."

  • come with the territory
    • To say that something comes with the territory means that it has to be accepted as part of a job or responsibility, even if it is unpleasant.
      "A successful actor has to expect intensive media coverage - it comes with the territory!"

  • come what may
    • If you declare that you will do something come what may, you are saying that you will do it whatever the consequences may be.
      "Come what may, I'm going to tell my mother-in-law what I think of her attitude."

  • (get) comeuppance
    • When someone gets their comeuppance, they receive the treatment they deserve (usually punishment or retribution) for their behaviour or actions.
      "Any pupils found bullying the newcomers will soon get their comeuppance."

  • common ground
    • This expression refers to an area of shared beliefs, interests or mutual understanding between people or groups who often have disagreements.
      "Any common ground among the Mediterranean countries will contribute to future unity."

  • common knowledge
    • When information is well-known to everyone (particularly in a community or group), it is called common knowledge. "You didn't know the intern was Jack's son? It thought it was common knowledge."

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