Follow us on Facebook
Facebook icon

Welcome to my guestmap
Please place a pin on the guestmap to show where you come from.

Free Guestmap from Bravenet.com
Many thanks for all your encouraging messages.

Guestmap information

Visitors:
 


English Idioms and Idiomatic Expressions 


Alphabetical List of Idioms A, page 6

(Idioms A, page 6:  at the bottom of the ladder  →  axe to grind)


  • at the bottom of the ladder
    • Someone who is at the bottom of the ladder occupies the lowest or most basic position or is hired at entry level.
      "In their first job most people start at the bottom of the ladder. "

  • at death's door
    • This expression is used to describe someone who is seriously ill or very close to death.
      "The boy was so ill that he was at death's door for several days."

  • at sixes and sevens
    • If someone or something is at sixes and sevens they are in a state of total confusion or they are completely disorganised.
      "This is not a good time to have guests. Everything is at sixes and sevens since we moved house."

  • at someone's beck and call
    • If a person is at someone's beck and call  they are ready to obey orders instantly.
      "He's incapable of doing anything himself. He's used to having people at his beck and call."

  • at this stage of the game
    • This expression refers to the current point reached in a process, activity or developing situation.
      "At this stage of the game I think any further intervention would be unwise. Let's wait and see how things develop."

  • at stake
    • Someone who has a lot at stake is in a risky situation, with a lot to be won or lost.
      "He was nervous about signing the agreement because there was a lot at stake"

  • automatic pilot
    • If you are on automatic pilot, you do something without thinking about it or having to pay attention, because you do it regularly.
      "At first I was worried about looking after a baby but after a few weeks I was on automatic pilot!

  • of no avail
    • Something which is of no avail is not at all helpful or useful
      "The coffee machine wouldn't work, and the instruction leaflet was of no avail."

  • avowed intent
    • When someone makes a public declaration of their objective or goal, this is their avowed intent.
      "The avowed intent of the new government is to reduce unemployment."

  • a rude awakening
    • If you get a rude awakening, you are forced to accept the unpleasant truth or reality.
      "She thought Charlie would want her back, but she got a rude awakening - he was already dating another girl."

  • away with the fairies
    • Someone who is away with the fairies is in such a dreamy state that they are not totally in touch with reality and give the impression of being slightly mad.
      "It's no use trying to explain the problem to her - she's away with the fairies!"

  • (have an) axe to grind
    • If you have an axe to grind, you have personal reasons for becoming involved in something or adopting a particular attitude.
      "It was decided that the best candidate would be selected by a recruitment agency who had no axe to grind within the company"

previous page...

More Idioms: 

 alphabetical lists A ... 



 more alphabetical lists... 
« A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ »



Please note that British English spelling is used on this website.

 cookie policy